Relationship

Are we still a sex object? Are we Sexy or is it already Sexist? “Emily in Paris” describe it perfectly

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In the past a modern woman, taking care of body and cloth could be well seen as a sex object. Today, women are showing their independence and are sexy but not necessary seen as sex object. 

sexy vs. sexist

First of all, it is worth to know the difference between sexy and sexist. According to Cambridge dictionary the term sexy is used to describe something that attracts a lot of interest and excitement, whereas sexist  is suggesting that the members of one sex are less able, intelligent, etc. than the members of the other sex, or sexist is referring to that sex’s bodies, behaviour or feelings in a negative way.

Women believe that are not anymore associated with animal or objects and are not reduced to their sexual body parts. Women also do believe, that they are less and less seen as a sex object, however the numbers of violence, sex trafficking and raped cases show us completely different view.

It is completely normal for heterosexual men to see women to whom they are sexually attracted as sex objects.

I know that everyone would like to be appreciated for their intellect and various skills. But let’s face it. It’s not for women to buy clothes, do their makeup, and run to the hairdresser to be less attractive to guys. We try to draw attention to ourselves. So it makes no sense to be indignant when someone finally appreciates it. We don’t have to go out for everyone right away. Just like not every thing that we like about the store, we have to buy. However, we almost always enter, see, touch or try on. 

Every normal heterosexual man who sees a woman as a sexual object can also completely respect her mind, her character, and everything else non-sexual about her. Men do this all the time.

Sexual objectification is seeing people as objects of desire, not as a person

In a word: as something with which, as the subject – user, I can have sex solely for my satisfaction and well-being. It is not difficult to guess that the sexual objects in most cases are women.

We perceive a person in terms of personality, intellect, sense of humor, skills, that is, everything that cannot be seen with the naked eye, that we know and discover, and this process makes them attractive (or not) in our eyes. The sexual object is merely an object of desire, a gem of seeing that we want to possess (or not).

We forget that objectification on such a scale leads to self-objectification and is so dangerous that instead of perceiving ourselves as beings, we women begin to see ourselves as a set of elements, mainly imperfect, that need improvement in order to deserve. On attention, on admiration. Therefore, we let ourselves be persuaded that by adopting certain patterns of behavior, we gain value. But a market that reflects only in the eyes of others.

Often, when I’m cycling on the street, drivers honk at me not because I’m doing something stupid or creating an emergency, but to slow down, lower the windshield and blink. And I know there would be many who would try to prove to me that this is a compliment that I should feel good about it. Are women honking at man who also rides a bicycle? It’s easy to guess …

Sexuality does not equal sexualization

Thinking someone is attractive, or even telling them so, does not mean that we are objectifying them. Just like sexuality does not equal sexualization. Enjoying sex, which is a natural and very enjoyable activity, is different from seeing the other person as a product made for our sexual pleasure.

Watch “Emily in Paris” and you also will be touched with some scenes, where the sense of sexy and sexist is being shown. 

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